#RSGSTYLE: JANE’S CABINET OF CURIOSITIES

Collecting, curating and displaying are the three key steps you need to create the most charming and personal cabinet of curiosities. Co-Founder Jane Rockett’s home is brimming with vintage finds and items that are more memory than accessory.

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From unique flea market discoveries, designer additions and time-worn shells plucked from beach trips, these black framed shelves hold years of treasured memories that each tell a story. We all have items that we hold dear and wouldn’t dream of chucking away, so why not keep them on display? In a world where we are overloaded with information and things, it’s important to select, refine and arrange in a way that makes your home as suitable as it can be for you.

Traditionally, a Cabinet of Curiosity (also known as ‘wonder rooms’) are small collections of extraordinary objects which, like today’s museums, were designed to categorise and tell stories about the wonders and oddities of the natural world. The scenes were intended to work like plays or stories, which is exactly what you can recreate through your own cabinet display! Your home should always fill you with awe and delight.

Here are the memories behind Director Jane Rockett’s own wonder room

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A pop of tropical colour brings attention to the cabinet. This Frida Kahlo inspired image was a gift from Jane’s brother from a trip to Mexico, and the curvacious lady painting was discovered in a small gallery in Budapest. Proudly overlooking the room is the Eames House Bird – an RSG favourite! As reflected in many Instagram posts, Jane loves to take inspiration from travel, so many of her special items have been collected along the way to display as a reminder of the trips she loves most.

My Cabinet of treasures is the thing I would try and save if my house was on fire (after my children of course!). It reminds me of good times, special people and important moments in my life. It is my version of a photo album filled with mementos from a heart shaped leaf from my daughter to an old photo of my grandfather.” – Jane Rockett

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A collection of shells rest on different shelves in the cabinet, each gathered from the stunning Pansy Island in Mozambique. The slim ivory discs you can see above are not only beautiful to look at, but evoke memories of stretching white sands and crystal waters. Bliss. Alongside these well-traveled treasures hangs a delicate necklace with charms and a photo booth picture of a birthday celebration made bold by the Bella Freud matches to the left.

Above you can spot some aged coral and a family photo. These monochrome memories have been stylishly placed and are each as meaningful as the next. The long-eared rabbit head is a quirky ceramic piece from artist Rory Dobner – not every single item needs meaning – some you just love which is a story in itself!

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More personal photos and rounded white silhouettes are in keeping with the Cabinet’s theme. A balance of shapes and sizes is the difference between clutter and curation! This lovely Ceramic Bulldog by Young & Battaglia is something that we’ve long-loved at RSG! His gilded paws and chinoiserie haunches inject a flash of fun amongst the black and white.

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These bright blooms are courtesy of Jane’s daughter. We love how the contrast of each drawing invites a sweet playfulness into the space.  As atop the cabinet, this splash of colour on the bottom shelf means every level pops and takes you through a interesting visual journey from shelf to shelf – just as wonder room  should!

If you have a Cabinet of curiosities that you’d like to share, tag your pics with #rockettstgeorge on Instagram and we’ll feature our favourites on our Houzz page!

For even more amazingly eclectic inspiration for your own display, check out our
Curiosity Cabinet Pinterest Board…

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